Coercive Control – Like Walking on Eggshells

a post by The Survivor

I came across an interesting article called Beyond “Witnessing”: Children’s Experiences of Coercive Control in Domestic Violence and Abuse (Callaghan,  Alexander, Sixsmith, & Fellin, 2015). This article introduced me to the concept ‘coercive control’ which I thought was intriguing. Academically, these words were new to me, but personally I found they were affiliated with my childhood experience. Helen Walmsley-Johnson on This Morning shared her experience on coercive control. Helen’s story seemed familiar to my mum’s story. The common factor they had was that they both did not recognise they were being emotionally battered by their husbands. I did not recognise it either. Helen’s story left me in a state of epiphany.

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Who’s telling our stories?

post by Rachel Wallis

In recent times, barely a week has gone by without media coverage of the teacher shortage or poor working conditions of nurses. The public are well-informed about the low salaries, high workloads and extra duties that are driving teachers and nurses out of the cities, and the profession. Representatives from the Principles Association, or the New Zealand Nurses Association are regularly interviewed regarding their concerns for their profession and it appears they are backed up by the general public.
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Babies behind bars

post by Princess Leia

For a number of years, the practice of ‘babies behind bars’ has grown in popularity. This phenomenon has been increasing over the past ten years in many different countries, including America and the United Kingdom. Netflix has even released a documentary about one of these occurrences in the United States. The situations always play out relative to mothers and babies within female prisons. In the UK, the units cater for mothers with babies under the age of eighteen months as women who either give ‘birth in prison or have a child under 18 months old they can apply to bring their child to prison with them’.

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